The Nude in the 21st Century

James Archer



Andy Beck



Alexandra Becker-Black



Joseph Besch



Mike Binzer



Susan Boehm



Sarah Burns



Reed Clarke



Don Copper



Robert Creighton



Angela Cunningham



Angela Cunningham



Seth Daulton



Seth Daulton



Evan Degenfelder



Rachel Foster



Graehound



Alison Harris



Larissa Hauck



Annie Heisey



Sabrina Hughes



Michael Kelly



Elizabeth Kendall



Patrick Kernan



Patrick Kernan



Junsoo Kim



Junsoo Kim



Cynthia Lahti



Cynthia Lahti



Cathy Locke



V.E. Long



V.E. Long



Mary Mahoney



Mary Mahoney



Andrea Moni



Kathryn Nussdorf



Colin Poole



Gail Postal



Gail Postal



Nick Reszetar



Ben Rosenberg



Ben Rosenberg



Robert Rosenthal



Robert Rosenthal



Bethany Rowland



Steven Rushefsky



Soo Ock Ryu



Dixie Salazar



Deborah Shapiro



Deborah Shapiro



Gregory Siler



Ellen Soderquist



Ellen Soderquist



Jon Sours



Tovah Stevenson



Lisa Taylor



Georganne Watters


Larissa Hauck
(Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada)
Artist Website

Untitled, Oil on Canvas, 20x30

Throughout the ongoing history of art the female figure has been an element of enigma and mystery. Women are used as symbols of masculine lust and regarded as objects of desire, instead of human beings. There is an overall theme of woman as the object of art instead of the creator. I feel as though this is an issue that is still prominent today, especially when we look outside of the art world and into everyday society. Within the media women's bodies are dehumanized and exploited in order to sell to both female and male consumers.
The perspective of the male gaze is completely evident in advertisements, television shows, movies, and news articles. To live as a woman or anyone else that is considered different in a world that is only seen through one perspective is detrimental to one's mental stability and self-worth. We must recognize this and understand that the way genders are presented in the media is incredibly far off from the true living-breathing individual. I hope to challenge and expose these views with my artwork by isolating and dehumanizing feminine forms.
Generally the figures within my work are twisted into discomforting and provoking forms. They are then fragmented and mutated together which can form into awkward imagery. I use this tool of fragmentation within my paintings because I feel as though it helps remove the figure as having a single identity and it becomes more relatable to others. It also is a comment on the media's self-proclaimed control over the female body. I crop the image to push it even more into the realm of an object. Instead of the direct use of the gaze I incorporate the human hand. These images are painted in a way that is usually catching and kind to the eye from afar, but then once the viewer is closer they realize that what they are looking at is not very beautiful. I try to do this in order to have a push and pull to my artwork.
My work is developing further with each piece. I believe that an artist must always question themselves and force themselves into new territories because otherwise they will be trapped in a destructive cycle of banality.


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